John Brown House Museum

RIHS Partners With Mount Vernon to Host Teacher Appreciation Week

RIHS Partners With Mount Vernon to Host Teacher Appreciation Week

The Rhode Island Historical Society is proud to announce the full schedule of programming for Teacher Appreciation Week, presented in partnership with George Washington’s Mount Vernon and taking place August 15 through August 19 at various RIHS sites in Providence and Woonsocket. During Teacher Appreciation Week, educators can enjoy free workshops and museum admission; info sessions about the resources that the RIHS offers in and out of the classroom; as well as special discounts on membership, gift shop purchases, and walking tours.

RIHS Talk and Walk to Mark H.P. Lovecraft’s Birthday

RIHS Talk and Walk to Mark H.P. Lovecraft’s Birthday

In commemoration of the 126th anniversary of Providence native H.P. Lovecraft’s birth, the Rhode Island Historical Society will offer two special events in August: A presentation from artist Jason C. Eckhardt on “Illustrating Lovecraft’s Fungi From Yuggoth,” taking place August 18, and the walking tour “H.P. Lovecraft: A Literary Life” on August 20, the author’s birthday.

March 12 Is Museum Day Live! at the RIHS

March 12 Is Museum Day Live! at the RIHS

Held during Women’s History Month, this special edition of the Smithsonian’s signature Museum Day Live! event will encourage all people – and particularly women and girls of color – to explore their nation’s museums, cultural institutions, zoos, aquariums, parks, and libraries, which will offer free admission for the day.

As a Smithsonian Affiliate, the RIHS is thrilled to take part in Museum Day Live!, and we’ll be offering free admission at the John Brown House Museum and the Museum of Work & Culture on Saturday, March 12.

Announcement: The RIHS Removes Four Dead Elm Trees From John Brown House Museum Property

Announcement: The RIHS Removes Four Dead Elm Trees From John Brown House Museum Property

Of interest to our members, friends, and supporters: We regret to announce that the Rhode Island Historical Society was forced to remove four more dead elm trees from the John Brown House Museum property. The RIHS hired TF Morra Tree Care, Inc., to handle the removal (as well as, potentially, a replanting strategy of more varied and disease-resistant trees in the coming months and years), and as this stage of the project draws to a close, we present Executive Director C. Morgan Grefe’s official statement on a painful decision that wasn’t really a decision at all: